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Vermont State Flag Vermont

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The Geography of Vermont

Click here  for a few definitions.

Longitude / Latitude Longitude: 71° 28'W to 73° 26'W
Latitude: 42° 44'N to 45° 0' 43"N
Vermont map
Vermont base and elevation maps
Length x Width Vermont is about 160 miles long and 80 miles wide.  
Geographic Center
Explanation
The geographic center of Vermont is located in Washington County, 3 miles east of Roxbury.
Longitude: 72° 40.3'W
Latitude: 43° 55.6'N
 
Borders Vermont is bordered by Canada on the north and Massachusetts in the south. On the east, Vermont is bordered by New Hampshire. On the west, Vermont is bordered by New York.
Total Area Vermont covers 9,615 square miles, making it the 45th largest of the 50 states.
Land Area 9,249 square miles of Vermont are land areas.
Water Area 366 square miles of Vermont are covered by water.
Highest Point The highest point in Vermont is Mt. Mansfield at 4,393 feet above sea level.
Lowest Point The lowest point in Vermont is Lake Champlain at 95 feet above sea level.
Mean Elevation The Mean Elevation of the state of Vermont is 1,000 feet above sea level.
Major Rivers West River, Otter River, Winooski River
Major Lakes Lake Champlain, Lake Memphremagog,

The Land

A New England state famous for its Green Mountains, Vermont can be divided into six geographical land regions; the Northeast Highlands, the Western New England Upland, the Green Mountains, the Vermont Valley, the Taconic Mountains, and the Champlain Valley.

Northeast Highlands: The Northeast Highlands are found in the northeast corner of Vermont. This geographic land area also covers parts of New Hampshire and Maine and is characterized by granite mountains that reach heights of 2,700 to 3,330 feet above sea level in Vermont. The highest of these mountains in Vermont are Gore Mountain (3,330 feet), Burke Mountain (3,267 feet), and Mt. Monadnock (3,140). The granite mountains of the Northeast Highlands are divided by swift flowing streams.

Western New England Upland: Most of eastern Vermont is covered by the Western New England Upland, a geographic land area that stretches south to Massachusetts and Connecticut. Sometimes called the Vermont Piedmont, this area is covered by the fertile lowlands of the Connecticut River Valley. Populated with many lakes in the north, the land rises gradually from east to west to the granite hills near Barre.

Green Mountains: The famouns Green Mountains cover most of the Green Mountain region in central Vermont. The Green Mountains give way to the Northfield, Worcestor, and other lower mountain ranges in the north. The Green Mountains support the tallest mountains in Vermont. The highest peak in Vermont, Mount Mansfield, at 4,393 feet above sea level, is found in this region along with Camel's Hump (4,083 feet) seen on the Vermont state commemorative quarter released in 2001. The Green Mountains are an important source of minerals such as granite, marble, slate and talc, as well as the center of the Vermont tourism industry.

Vermont Valley: The Vermont Valley is a small strip of land in western Vermont. This area consists of small rivers and river valleys and stretches from the border of Massachusetts in the south into central Vermont. The Baton Kill and Waloomsac rivers are found in the Vermont Valley.

Taconic Mountains: The Taconic Mountains, extending from Massachusetts, cover a a narrow strip in southwestern Vermont. This area is characterized by mountains, swift streams, and beautiful lakes. Equinox Mountain (3,816 feet), Dorset Peak (3,770 feet), Little Equinox Mountain (3,320 feet), Mother Myrick Mountain (3,290 feet), and Bear Mountain (3,260 feet) are found in the Taconic Mountains of Vermont.

Champlain Valley: The Champlain Valley borders Lake Champlain. The Vermont Lowland, as this area is sometimes called, is fertile farmland. Dairy farms, apple orchards, and fields of corn, hay, oats, wheat, are found in the Champlain Valley along with Vermont's largest city, Burlington.

( Vermont Close-up )

Climate (All temperatures Fahrenheit)
Highest Temperature The highest temperature recorded in Vermont is 105°, Fahrenheit. This record high was recorded on July 4, 1911 at Vernon.
Lowest Temperature The lowest temperature in Vermont, -50°, was recorded on December 30, 1933 at Bloomfield.
Average Temperature Monthly average temperatures range from a high of 80.5 degrees to a low of 7.7 degrees.
Climate Average yearly precipitation for Vermont, from 1971 to 2000, is shown on this chart from Oregon State University.
Sources:
The World Almanac of the U.S.A. by Allan Carpenter and Carl Provorse, Copyright © 1998
Harold A. Meeks and John McCardell, "Vermont," World Book Online Americas Edition, http://www.worldbookonline.com/wbol/wbPage/na/ar/co/583420, August 15, 2001.
The United States Geological Survey Website
Maps.com http://www.maps.com
To Utah geography. To Virginia geography.

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