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The Lee Bros. Simple Fresh Southern: Knockout Dishes with Down-Home Flavor The Lee Bros. Simple Fresh Southern: Knockout Dishes with Down-Home Flavor
by Matt and Ted Lee
256 pages. Publisher: Clarkson Potter; First Edition edition (November 3, 2009) From two South Carolina-bred brothers comes the ground-breaking cookbook for new Southern cooking: The Lee Bros. Simple, Fresh, Southern. Matt and Ted Lee were raised on long-simmered greens, slow-smoked meats, and deep-fried everything. But after years of traveling as journalists and with farm fresh foods more available than ever, Matt and Ted have combined the old with the new, infusing family recipes with bright flavors. Using crisp produce, lighter cooking methods, and surprising combinations, these are recipes to make any night of the week.
The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook: Stories and Recipes for Southerners and Would-be Southerners The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook: Stories and Recipes for Southerners and Would-be Southerners
by Matt and Ted Lee
600 pages. Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Probable First Edition edition (October 17, 2006) From The New York Times food writers who defended lard and demystified gumbo comes a collection of exceptional southern recipes for everyday cooks. The Lee Bros. Southern Cookbook tells the story of the brothers' culinary coming-of-age in Charleston-how they triumphed over their northern roots and learned to cook southern without a southern grandmother. Here are recipes for classics like Fried Chicken, Crab Cakes, and Pecan Pie, as well as little-known preparations such as St. Cecilia Punch, Pickled Peaches, and Shrimp Burgers. Others bear the hallmark of the brothers' resourceful cooking style-simple, sophisticated dishes like Blackened Potato Salad, Saigon Hoppin' John, and Buttermilk-Sweet Potato Pie that usher southern cooking into the twenty-first century without losing sight of its roots. With helpful sourcing and substitution tips, this is a practical and personal guide that will have readers cooking southern tonight, wherever they live.
Hoppin' John's Lowcountry Cooking Hoppin' John's Lowcountry Cooking
by John Martin Taylor
Hailed as one of the best regional cookbooks ever written. At rural oyster roasts and barbecues, in fancy Charleston restaurants and renovated townhouses, the luxuriant cooking of the Carolina coast, known as the Lowcountry, has made a dramatic reappearance. John Martin Taylor, who grew up casting shrimp nets off Hilton Head Island, collected a wealth of traditional and contemporary recipes that represent the region's best, from She-Crab Soup and Sweet Potato Pie to Shrimp and Grits and Sweet Watermelon Pickles.
Hoppin' John's Charleston, Beaufort & Savannah: Dining at Home in the Low Country Hoppin' John's Charleston, Beaufort & Savannah: Dining at Home in the Low Country
by John Martin Taylor
Called "The National Champion of lowcountry cuisine" by the Los Angeles Times, John Martin Taylor is the perfect guide to lead you on this illustrated tour of Charleston, Beaufort, and Savannah, where you're invited to dine at some of the most gracious homes south of the Mason-Dixon line. Seventy-five recipes in the form of fifteen menus are served up at some of the most elegant locales the region has to offer. Hoppin' John explains the traditional foods of the lowcountry and the traditional ways in which it's served - and by planning menus according to season, only the freshest and ripest ingredients are used.
Mrs. Whaley Entertains: Advice, Opinions, and 100 Recipes from a Charleston Kitchen Mrs. Whaley Entertains: Advice, Opinions, and 100 Recipes from a Charleston Kitchen
by Emily Whaley, William Baldwin (Contributor)
It turns out Mrs. Whaley, at eighty-seven, had a good deal more on her mind that she had no intention of keeping to herself. A favorite hobby, cooking delicious meals and serving them to the people she loved, was ripe for the picking and her opinions on fostering friendship and love as quotable as ever: "What experience has taught me is that people consider it a special compliment to be invited to a meal. [But] if the hostess is all aflutter like a butterfly caught in a net, then as the Irish say, "I wish I was to home and the party was to hell!"

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