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Vermont State Flower

Red Clover   Adopted:1894
Vermont State Flower: Red Clover
Vermont State Flower: Red Clover

Adoption of the Vermont State Flower

Inspired by the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago and its National Garland of Flowers, Vermonters were determined to adopt an official state floral emblem that would uniquely represent their state.

On October 19, 1894 a concurrent resolution to adopt an official flower was introduced in the Vermont House. A special committee, comprised of one member from each of Vermont's fourteen counties, took the matter under consideration.

Vermonters campaigned hard for their favorites. The daisy, trailing arbutus, the posy, mayflower, the buttercup, and red clover were among the flowers preferred by citizens of the state.

When all the votes were counted, the red clover won the day with 9,575 votes, a resounding statement from the state's farmers. The daisy followed with 2,569 votes and the buttercup garnered third place with 945 votes.

On November 8, a bill was amended to specify the red clover as the state's official flower.

The next day, on November 9, 1894, the red clover was adopted as the state flower by the Thirteenth Biennial Session of the General Assembly with an effective date of February 1, 1895.

From the Vermont Secretary of State:

No. 159 of the Acts of 1894, effective February 1, 1895, designated the Red Clover as the official State Flower. Both an integral part of many a cultivated hay field and a common sight along numerous Vermont roadsides, the Red Clover is symbolic of Vermont's scenic countryside generally and of its dairy farms in particular. Oddly enough, however, Trifolium pratense is not a native of Vermont but was "naturalized" from Europe.

------ from Office of the Secretary of State, Vermont Legislative Directory and State Manual,Biennial Session,1993-1994,p.15.

The Vermont Statutes

The following information is excerpted from the Vermont Statutes, Title 1 Chapter 11, Section 498.

Additional Information

Vermont State Flower: Red Clover
Vermont State Flower: Red Clover

Trifolium pratense (Red Clover): Plant Encyclopedia from MyGardenGuide.

Plant Profile for Trifolium pratense (Red Clover): USDA, NRCS. 2004. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

Trifolium pratense L.: Purdue University Center for New Crops & Plants Products.

State Flower List: List of all of the state flowers.

State Birds & Flowers 1000-pc Puzzle: Created at the request of The National Wildlife Federation this design is a beautiful and informative puzzle featuring every state bird perched on the appropriate state flower.

State Birds and Flowers Coloring Book by Annika Bernhard - 51 accurately detailed, copyright-free renderings include national bird (eagle) and flower (rose) plus 50 state birds and flowers.

U. S. State Flowers in Cross Stitch by Gerda Bengtsson - Botanically correct cross stitch designs of state flowers of the 50 States.

Quilting Flowers of the States by Sue Harvey - A lovely 12-inch flower block for each of the 50 states. Techniques used are piecing, appliqué, paper-piecing and three-dimensional techniques.

Plants, Seeds & Flowers: Bulbs, seeds, plants, fertilizer, plant containers and more.

Gardening Tools: Pruners, rakes, shovels, hoes, trowels, cultivators and tillers, greenhouses, yard carts and more.

State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide, Third Edition - Benjamin F. Shearer and Barbara S. Shearer, Greenwood Press, 2002

State Names, Flags, Seals, Songs, Birds, Flowers and Other Symbols: A Study based on historical documents giving the origin and significance of the state names, nicknames, mottoes, seals, flowers, birds, songs, and descriptive comments on the capitol buildings and on some of the leading state histories, Revised Edition - George Earlie Shankle, Ph.D., The H.W. Wilson Company, 1938 (Reprint Services Corp. 1971)


Source: The Vermont Statutes Online, (http://www.leg.state.vt.us/statutes/statutes2.htm), September 12, 2005
Source: Vermont Secretary of State, (http://www.sec.state.vt.us/), September 23, 2005
Source: The National Geographic Magazine, Volume 31, Number 6. "Our State Flowers." Page 483. 1917.
Source: State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide, Third Edition - Benjamin F. Shearer and Barbara S. Shearer, Greenwood Press, 2002
Source: State Names, Flags, Seals, Songs, Birds, Flowers and Other Symbols: Revised Edition (Reprint)- George Earlie Shankle, Ph.D., The H.W. Wilson Company, 1938

 
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