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Colorado State Amphibian

Western Tiger Salamander Ambystoma mavortium Adopted: March 16, 2012
Colorado state amphibian
Colorado State Amphibian: Western Tiger Salamander
Photographs

Governor John Hickenlooper signed House Bill No. 12-1147 on March 16, 2012, adopting the western tigar salamander as the official amphibian of the State of Colorado.


Sources...

Williams, Angela. "House Bill No. 12-1147.." The State of Colorado. Colorado General Assembly. The State of Colorado, 2012. Web.


Additional Information

Colorado for the Tiger Salamander: Facebook.

Ambystoma mavortium: Caudata Culture: The information resource for newt and salamander enthusiasts.

Ambystoma mavortium: The University of California's Amphibiaweb.

Ambystoma mavortium (Barred Tiger Salamander) Also: Western Tiger Salamander: The University of Michigan Museum of Zoology: Animal Diversity Web.

Ambystoma mavortium - (Baird, 1850) Barred Tiger Salamander: A network connecting science with conservation - NatureServe Explorer: An Online Encyclopedia of Life.

Ambystoma mavortium Baird, 1850: Integrated Taxonomic Information System (ITIS) Here you will find authoritative taxonomic information on plants, animals, fungi, and microbes of North America and the world.

State amphibians: Complete list of official state amphibians from NETSTATE.COM

More symbols & emblems: Complete list of official Colorado state symbols from NETSTATE.COM.

What is an Amphibian? (The Science of Living Things) , by Bobbie Kalman and Jacqueline Langille, 32 pages, Crabtree Publishing Company (2000). Reading level: Ages 9-12. The large, full-color photographs and illustrations that pepper every page of these books will catch the eye of browsers but it is the informative, easy-to-read texts that will hold their interest.

Peterson First Guide to Reptiles and Amphibians , by Robert C. Stebbins, Joseph T. Collins and Roger Conant. Edited by Roger Tory Peterson. 128 pages, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (April 15, 1999). From mudpuppies to rattlesnakes, this fascinating guide for young nature lovers describes the habits and habitats of these secretive and sometimes bizarre animals, and includes tips on how to catch and care for frogs, snakes, turtles, lizards, salamanders, and toads.

Newts and Salamanders: Everything About Selection, Care, Nutrition, Diseases, Breeding, and Behavior
Newts and Salamanders
by Frank Indiviglio

Salamanders of the United States and Canada: by James W. Petranka. 587 pages. Smithsonian; 1 edition (July 17, 1998) This survey of North American salamanders is the first since the 1940s and presents the most up-to-date research on every species. Beginning with two keys to help the reader identify an animal in the hand, whether it is an adult or a larva ("tadpole"), the book then discusses each species individually.

Newts and Salamanders: Everything About Selection, Care, Nutrition, Diseases, Breeding, and Behavior by Frank Indiviglio. 96 pages. Barron's Educational Series (June 1, 1997) Terrarium enthusiasts will find up-to-date information and full-color photos describing the major native and exotic species of newts and salamanders.

The author gives advice on feeding and keeping them in a healthful environment. Topics include creating the various types of habitats, nutrition, reproduction, the treatment of diseases, and sources of food and supplies.