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Vermont State Pie

Apple Pie Adopted: May 10, 1999
Vermont state pie
Vermont State Pie: Apple Pie
Pie for your walls

House Bill No. 302 proposed apple pie as the state pie of Vermont and the apple as the state fruit. It also prescribed a series of conditions for serving apple pie. Governor Howard Dean signed the bill into law on May 10, 1999.

But, back in February, 1999, when State Representative Edward Paquin introduced House Bill No 302 proposing an official state pie and an official state fruit, he neglected to tie the two together with the proper serving etiquette.

The omission did not go unnoticed by Representative Bourdeau however and, before the bill was passed in the House of Representatives, it was amended to prescribe a series of options for enjoying a slice of apple pie.

The final bill offered three options for appropriate enjoyment of a slice of apple pie. Though not written into law, pie lovers were advised to enjoy their pie with one or more of the following:

  • with a glass of cold milk;
  • with a slice of cheddar cheese weighing a minimum of 1/2 ounce;
  • with a large scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Your choice!

NO. 15. AN ACT RELATING TO DESIGNATING THE STATE PIE AND THE STATE FRUIT.

(H.302)

It is hereby enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Vermont:

Sec. 1. 1 V.S.A. § 512 is added to read:

§ 512. STATE PIE

The state pie shall be apple pie.

Sec. 2. SERVING APPLE PIE

When serving apple pie in Vermont, a "good faith" effort shall be made to meet one or more of the following conditions:

(a) with a glass of cold milk,

(b) with a slice of cheddar cheese weighing a minimum of 1/2 ounce,

(c) with a large scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Sec. 3. 1 V.S.A. § 513 is added to read:

§ 513. STATE FRUIT

The state fruit shall be the apple.

Approved: May 10, 1999


Sources...

The State of Vermont. The Vermont State Legislature. House Bill No. 302. Montpelier: The State of Vermont, 1999. Web. <http://www.leg.state.vt.us/database/status/summary.cfm?Bill=H.0302&Session=2000>.
"Vermont Statutes Annotated." LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc.. LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc., n.d. Web. 20 Feb 2012. <http://www.michie.com/vermont/lpext.dll?f=templates&fn=main-h.htm&cp=vtcode>.
Shearer, Benjamin F. and Barbara S. State Names, Seals, Flags and Symbols: A Historical Guide Third Edition, Revised and Expanded. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 3 Sub edition, 2001.


Additional Information

Vermont state pie
Vermont State Pie: Apple Pie
Pie for your walls

Make the Best Apple Pie to Chase the Blues and Grays Away: Some days on our homestead, apple pie is not just desired, it’s required. Mother Earth News.

The Perfect Apple Pie: Making the perfect apple pie is all about having a perfect apple pie recipe, and this article contains some of the best, including recipes for pie crust, Dutch apple pie, cider apple pie, sugar-free apple pie and other varieties. Mother Earth News.

Pie Fidelity: Apple pie from the New York Times Magazine, by Sam Sifton.

Apple Pie Recipes: Apple pie recipes from FoodNetwork.com.

Apple Pie Recipes: Apple pie recipes and apple pie video from AllRecipes.com.

State foods: Complete list of official state foods from NETSTATE.COM.

More symbols & emblems: Complete list of official Vermont state symbols from NETSTATE.COM.

The Apple Pie Tree
The Apple Pie Tree
Zoe Hall

The Apple Pie Tree, by Zoe Hall. 99 pages. Publisher: Blue Sky Press; 1 edition (September 1, 1996) Reading level: Ages 4-6. This simple nature story, told from the point of view of two young sisters, describes the changes that occur in a backyard apple tree. The story begins in winter with the tree bare and brown, and moves into spring when two robins build a nest and lay three blue eggs among the leaf buds and pretty pink apple blossoms. The robins guard their eggs by chirping loudly at intruders, and just as the flower buds open, so the baby birds break through their eggshells. As the blossoms grow on the tree, so do the feathers of the birds.

How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World
How to Make an Apple Pie
and See the World

Marjorie A. Priceman

How to Make an Apple Pie and See the World, by Marjorie A. Priceman. 40 pages. Publisher: Knopf Books for Young Readers (October 1, 1996) Reading level: Ages 5+. An apple pie is easy to make...if the market is open. But if the market is closed, the world becomes your grocery store. This deliciously silly recipe for apple pie takes readers around the globe to gather ingredients. First hop a steamboat to Italy for the finest semolina wheat. Then hitch a ride to England and hijack a cow for the freshest possible milk. And, oh yes! Don't forget to go apple picking in Vermont! A simple recipe for apple pie is included.

Apple Pie: 100 Delicious and Decidedly Different Recipes for America's Favorite Pie
Apple Pie
Ken Haedrich

Apple Pie: 100 Delicious and Decidedly Different Recipes for America's Favorite Pie, by Ken Haedrich. 256 pages. Publisher: Harvard Common Press (August 8, 2002) Apple Pie is an apple pie lover’s dream—100 recipes for apple pie in all its delicious incarnations, plus ten versatile crust recipes. There are pies with single crusts, pies with double crusts, and pies with decorative crusts, crumb toppings, and no toppings. There are traditional pies (My Mom and Dad’s Brown Sugar Apple Pie), new twists (Baked Apple Dumpling Pie, Apple and Brie Hand Pies), multi-fruit pies (Apple-Plum Pie with Coconut Streusel), and pies for those who love apples in any and all forms (Shaker Boiled Apple Cider Pie).

Apple Pie: An American Story
Apple Pie
John T. Edge

Apple Pie: An American Story, by John T. Edge. 176 pages. Publisher: G.P. Putnam's Sons (October 7, 2004) Tracing the history and lore of one of America's favorite desserts, the popular food writer follows the development of apple pie, from its English origins to its present-day variations across the country, journeying from Disney World, to the White House, to a Massachusetts Shaker community, to farmstands in Washington State, presenting fifteen varied recipes along the way.

Pie: 300 Tried-and-True Recipes for Delicious Homemade Pie
Pie
Ken Haedrich

Pie: 300 Tried-and-True Recipes for Delicious Homemade Pie, by Ken Haedrich. 6008 pages. Publisher: Harvard Common Press (September 29, 2004) Pie is the most comprehensive and accessible book ever written on the subject. This showcase of Ken Haedrich’s passion for pie represents a lifelong quest to demonstrate how easy and delicious homemade pie can be. Every recipe has been tested for success and features reassuring advice and specific tips. Pie celebrates the best pie recipes and traditions—both old and new—and is the only resource a home baker needs.

Although Haedrich’s scope is exhaustive, his approach to pie making is relaxed. An instructive, anecdotal introductory chapter walks home bakers through crust making, whether by food processor, electric mixer, or hand, as well as how to roll it out, what kind of rolling pins to use, which pans give a perfectly browned bottom crust, how to prevent burned edges, and how to make decorative edges, cutouts, and latticework.

He answers all the questions home bakers want to know: What will the crust look like when it is being mixed? How large should the crust be rolled? What should the filling look like when the pie is done? Why is it important to cool pies properly?