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Vermont State Heritage Breed of Livestock

Randall Lineback Breed of Cattle Adopted: March 9, 2006
Vermont state Heritage Breed of Livestock
Heritage Breed of Livestock: randall lineback breed of cattle
Randall lineback photograph

The Randall Linback Breed of Cattle was named the "official state heritage breed of livestock" when Governor Jim Douglas signed House Bill No. 468 on March 9, 2006.

Randall lineback cattle are one of America’s last surviving "landrace" cattle breeds. A landrace is a "local" variety that develops primarily by natural processes to adapt to the specific environment in which it lives. This is opposed to a formal breed which is deliberately and selectively bred to conform to a pre-existing set of formal standards.

The Randall lineback is one of the most endangered bovine breeds in the United States.

H.468

AN ACT RELATING TO THE DESIGNATION OF RANDALL LINEBACK CATTLE AS A STATE HERITAGE BREED OF LIVESTOCK

It is hereby enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Vermont:

Sec. 1. FINDINGS

The only traditional breed of cattle to have originated in Vermont is the Randall Lineback. The Randall Lineback breed is named for the Samuel Randall family of Sunderland who developed the breed approximately 100 years ago by carefully preserving a closed herd. The breed’s appearance and striking color pattern set it apart from the standardized breed and distinguish it as unique. As recently as 1985, the Randall Lineback breed faced extinction when the remaining herd reached a low of between 15 and 20 head. Today, the Randall Lineback breed is growing, but still remains critically rare with fewer than 200 head registered nationally. In consideration of the contributions of the Randall Lineback breed to the agricultural history of Vermont, the state recognizes that preservation of this critically rare breed is integral to the heritage of Vermont.

Sec. 2. 1 V.S.A. § 515 is added to read:

§ 515. STATE HERITAGE LIVESTOCK BREED

The Randall Lineback breed of cattle shall be an official state heritage breed of livestock.


Sources...

"Vermont Statutes Annotated." LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc.. LexisNexis, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc., n.d. Web. 20 Feb 2012. <http://www.michie.com/vermont/lpext.dll?f=templates&fn=main-h.htm&cp=vtcode>.
The State of Vermont. The Vermont State Legislature. House Bill No. 468. Montpelier: The State of Vermont, 2006. Web. <http://www.michie.com/vermont/lpext.dll?f=templates&fn=main-h.htm&cp=vtcode>.


Additional Information

Vermont state Heritage Breed of Livestock
Heritage Breed of Livestock: randall lineback breed of cattle

The Randall Cattle Story: Cynthia Greech's Involvement With The Breed.

Randall Lineback Breed Association: Official website.

The Randall Cattle Breed Registry: Official website.

State mammals: Complete list of official state mammals from NETSTATE.COM

More symbols & emblems: Complete list of official Vermont state symbols from NETSTATE.COM.

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