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Louisiana Cajun and Creole Heritage

Hoop nets, Cast nets, and Shrimp trawls   Adopted:1992
Louisiana Cajun and Creole Heritage
Hoop net diagram
Courtesy: United State Geological Survey
Louisiana Cajun and Creole Heritage
Throwing a cast net
Photo: United State Geological Survey
Louisiana Cajun and Creole Heritage
Double rigged shrimp trawler
Photo: Robert K. Brigham, NOAA

Louisiana Law

The following information was excerpted from the Louisiana Revised Statutes, Title 49, Section 170:3.


Source: Louisiana State Legislature, Louisiana Revised Statutes, (http://www.legis.state.la.us/lss/lss.asp?folder=75), January 15, 2009.
Source: State Names, Seals, Flags and Symbols: A Historical Guide Third Edition, Revised and Expanded by Benjamin F. Shearer and Barbara S. Shearer. Greenwood Press; 3 Sub edition (October 30, 2001).


Additional Information

Louisiana Folk Roots: Louisiana Folk Roots, based in Lafayette, the heart of Cajun and Creole Louisiana. Includes information Dewey Balfa Cajun and Creole Heritage Week.

Shrimping in Louisiana: Overview of a Tradition: Louisiana's Living Traditions.

Shrimp Trawlers: Louisiana's Living Traditions.

Small Old Time Hoop Net: Louisiana's Living Traditions: The Creole State Exhibit.

French, Cajun, Creole, Houma: A Primer On Francophone Louisiana, by Carl A. Brasseaux, 159 pages, Louisiana State University Press (February 17, 2005). A product of thirty years’ research, French, Cajun, Creole, Houma provides a reliable and understandable guide to the ethnic roots of a region long popular as an international tourist attraction.

Louisiana Culture from the Colonial Era to Katrina, edited by by John Lowe, 327 pages, Louisiana State University Press (December 15, 2008). A rich portrait of Louisiana culture, this volume stands as a reminder of why that culture must be preserved.

Mardi Gras, Gumbo, and Zydeco: Readings in Louisiana Culture, edited by by Marcia Gaudet and James C. McDonald, 179 pages, University Press of Mississippi (April 15, 2003). The essays show great range and are reprinted from hard-to-find publications. They include a description of Cajun Country Mardi Gras on the prairies of southwestern Louisiana, an analysis of the social implications of the New Orleans Mardi Gras parades, a study of the Houma Indians of coastal Louisiana, and an analysis of the devotion given to a young Cajun girl whom many regard as a saint. Collected here, the essays portray a land and a people that are unlike any other.

 
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