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South Carolina State Flower

Yellow Jessamine Gelsemium sempervirens Adopted:February 01, 1924
South Carolina State Flower: Yellow Jessamine
South Carolina State Flower: Yellow Jessamine

Adoption of the South Carolina State Flower

As far back as 1906 the yellow jessamine (also referred to as the Carolina jessamine and the evening trumpet flower or trumpet vine) was a popular flower among South Carolinians and why not? It was found in every county.

Dixie Chapter No. 395 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in Anderson, South Carolina (since disbanded) adopted the flower as their organization's official emblem in 1906. To honor the yellow flower, Teresa Strickland, of Anderson, wrote a poem for the Dixie Chapter called Legend of the Yellow Jessamine. A portion of the poem is quoted below:

On March 14, 1923, the South Carolina General Assembly took its first steps toward the adoption of an official state flower when they approved Joint Resolution No. 534. The resolution set out the provisions, by which a commission would be appointed to recommend an appropriate flower to represent the state. The resolution specified that the commission be comprised of

The commission completed their work and presented their report to the General Assembly the following year in February 1924. According to the Legislative Manual of the Seventy-seventh General Assembly of South Carolina, at Columbia, First Session...,

The report of the commission and their recommendation that the yellow jessamine be named the official flower of South Carolina was approved by the General Assembly on February 1, 1924. Reasons given for adoption of the yellow jessamine were that,

South Carolina has two official flowers. In 2003, the state adopted the goldenrod as the official state wildflower.

South Carolina Code of Laws

The committee to select the state flower was created by joint resolution and is not documented in the South Carolina Code of Laws.

Additional Information

South Carolina State Flower: Yellow Jessamine
South Carolina State Flower: Yellow Jessamine

Gelsemium sempervirens (Carolina Jessamine): Plant Encyclopedia from MyGardenGuide.

Plant Profile for Gelsemium sempervirens (Evening Trumpet Flower): USDA, NRCS. 2004. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

Yellow Jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens): West Virginia University Extension Service, Forage-Livestock Systems: Poisonous Plants of the Southern United States.

Gelsemium sempervirens (Carolina Jessamine): North Carolina State University, College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NC Cooperative Extension: Horticultural Science.

State Flower List: List of all of the state flowers.

State Birds & Flowers 1000-pc Puzzle: Created at the request of The National Wildlife Federation this design is a beautiful and informative puzzle featuring every state bird perched on the appropriate state flower.

State Birds and Flowers Coloring Book by Annika Bernhard - 51 accurately detailed, copyright-free renderings include national bird (eagle) and flower (rose) plus 50 state birds and flowers.

U. S. State Flowers in Cross Stitch by Gerda Bengtsson - Botanically correct cross stitch designs of state flowers of the 50 States.

Quilting Flowers of the States by Sue Harvey - A lovely 12-inch flower block for each of the 50 states. Techniques used are piecing, appliqué, paper-piecing and three-dimensional techniques.

Plants, Seeds & Flowers: Bulbs, seeds, plants, fertilizer, plant containers and more.

Gardening Tools: Pruners, rakes, shovels, hoes, trowels, cultivators and tillers, greenhouses, yard carts and more.

State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide, Third Edition - Benjamin F. Shearer and Barbara S. Shearer, Greenwood Press, 2002

State Names, Flags, Seals, Songs, Birds, Flowers and Other Symbols: A Study based on historical documents giving the origin and significance of the state names, nicknames, mottoes, seals, flowers, birds, songs, and descriptive comments on the capitol buildings and on some of the leading state histories, Revised Edition - George Earlie Shankle, Ph.D., The H.W. Wilson Company, 1938 (Reprint Services Corp. 1971)


Source: South Carolina Legislature Online, (http://www.scstatehouse.net/studentpage/flower.htm), September 9, 2005
Source: Communication from Peggy Carr, former member of the Dixie Chapter No. 395 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, September 10, 2005
Source: State Names, Seals, Flags, and Symbols: A Historical Guide, Third Edition - Benjamin F. Shearer and Barbara S. Shearer, Greenwood Press, 2002
Source: State Names, Flags, Seals, Songs, Birds, Flowers and Other Symbols: Revised Edition (Reprint)- George Earlie Shankle, Ph.D., The H.W. Wilson Company, 1938

 
To Rhode Island State Flower. To South Dakota Floral Emblem.

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