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Arizona Alternate State Anthem

Arizona   Adopted: 1982

Arizona

words and music by Rex Allen, Jr.

I love you, Arizona;
Your mountains, deserts and streams;
The rise of Dos Cabezas*
And the outlaws I see in my dreams;
I love you Arizona,
Superstitions** and all;
The warmth you give at sunrise;
Your sunsets put music in us all.

Oo, Arizona;
You're the magic in me;
Oo, Arizona,
You're the life-blood of me;

I love you Arizona;
Desert dust on the wind;
The sage and cactus are blooming,
And the smell of the rain on your skin.

Oo, Arizona;
You're the magic in me;
Oo, Arizona,
You're the life-blood of me. 
	

Copyright 1981
by BOXER MUSIC, Nashville, TN
The State of Arizona owns the copyright on this material under an agreement with Boxer Music.

Boxer is still charged with granting or denying use of the song. Contact Boxer at Rex Allen, Jr.

[ * ] Dos Cabezas, meaning two heads, refers to two mountain peaks. Visit Dos Cabezas Mountains Wilderness in Cochise County, Arizona.

[ ** ] Referring to the Superstition Mountains of Arizona. Visit the Superstition Mountain Museum in Apache Junction, Arizona.

Adoption of the alternate state anthem

Rex Allen, Jr. and his late father Rex Allen, were natives of Willcox, Arizona, about 20 miles west of the Dos Cabezas Mountains Wilderness. They are known world-wide for their famous renditions of cowboy songs.

In 1981, Rex Allen Jr. wrote a song about love he felt for the State of Arizona. It's a heartfelt tribute to the state.

A radio station in Phoenix initiated a movement to name Rex Allen's song, appropriately titled "Arizona," the official state song of the State of Arizona.

Presumably it would replace the current state anthem "Arizona," by Margaret Rowe Clifford and Maurice Blumenthal. Their "Arizona" had been adopted as the official state anthem in 1919.

Rex's song may have seemed more "current" to some but all was not smooth sailing for House Bill No. 2300. Blunt comments such as those made by State Representative Pete Corpstein of Phoenix set the stage.

No wonder we haven't heard some of these Arizona songs if they were as sorry as this one and no wonder we get the copyright to it. I think this is more of a funeral march than a state song.

("Dispatch" 13)

Sides were taken; country music fans versus traditionalists. In the end, compromise ruled the day and the best that Rex Allen Jr.'s "Arizona" could muster was the title of official state "alternate" anthem!

In 2011 and in 2012 attempts were made to name Rex Allen Jr.'s "Arizona" the state's official centennial song.

2012's House Concurrent Resolution No. 2021 is shown below.

House Engrossed

State of Arizona
House of Representatives
Fiftieth Legislature
Second Regular Session
2012

HOUSE CONCURRENT RESOLUTION 2021

A CONCURRENT RESOLUTION PROCLAIMING "ARIZONA" BY REX ALLEN, JR. TO BE THE STATE CENTENNIAL SONG.

Whereas, the song "Arizona," composed and sung by Rex Allen, Jr., was adopted as the alternate state anthem by the Arizona Legislature in 1982; and

Whereas, nearly thirty years later, the song's words hold as much meaning and emotion as they ever did for those who feel strong ties to the State of Arizona:

I love you, Arizona
Your mountains, deserts and streams
The rise of Dos Cabezas
And the outlaws I see in my dreams
I love you Arizona
Superstitions, Grand Canyon and all
The warmth you give at sunrise
Your sunsets put music in us all

Arizona You're the magic in me Arizona you're the life-blood of me
I love you, Arizona Desert dust on the wind The sage and cactus are blooming And the smell of the rain on your skin
Arizona You're the magic in me Arizona you're the life-blood of me

Whereas, in 2012 Arizona is celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of its statehood with numerous activities and events. On this auspicious occasion it is fitting that we honor the stirring words of "Arizona" as the State Centennial Song.

Therefore, Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring:

That the Members of the Legislature proclaim "Arizona" as the State Centennial Song and encourage this tribute to our great state to be played at all Centennial events.

2011's House Concurrent Resolution was similar with the differences noted in red below.

2011 House Concurrent Resolution No. 2051

Therefore, Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring:

That the Members of the Legislature proclaim "Arizona" as the State Centennial Song and encourage this state's citizens to commemorate Arizona's Centennial by learning this tribute to our great state.

2012 House Concurrent Resolution No. 2021

Therefore, Be it resolved by the House of Representatives of the State of Arizona, the Senate concurring:

That the Members of the Legislature proclaim "Arizona" as the State Centennial Song and encourage this tribute to our great state to be played at all Centennial events.

In each year a resolution was initiated in and adopted by the House but languished in the State Senate, failing to achieve full legislative approval.

Just as we ran into issues with the correct title for the Margaret Rowe Clifford's state anthem, so we are also somewhat confused by discrepancies we see with the title to Rex Allen's alternate state anthem.

We have seen it referred to simply as "Arizona" and also as "I Love You Arizona."

Please contact us if you can help us to unravel our dilemma.


Sources...

"House Concurrent Resolution No. 2021." Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona, 06 Feb 2012. Web. 04 Mar 2014.

"House Concurrent Resolution No. 2051." Arizona State Legislature. State of Arizona, 19 Apr 2011. Web. 14 Mar 2014.

McClory, Tony. "Ringtails, Bola Ties, and Dueling State Anthems" Understanding the Arizona Constitution 2010, Page 5. Print.

"House Approves State Song." Dispatch [Casa Grande] 11 February 1982, 13. Web. 18 Mar. 2014.

"About the State Songs" Arizona Secretary of State. 16 Mar 2014.

Shearer, Benjamin F. and Barbara S. State Names, Seals, Flags and Symbols: A Historical Guide Third Edition, Revised and Expanded. Westport, Conn: Greenwood Press, 3 Sub edition, 2001.


Additional Information

About the State Songs: Arizona Secretary of State Kid's Page (SOS For Kids).

Arizona Anthemsadobe document: Office of the Arizona Secretary of State.

State songs: Complete list of official state songs from NETSTATE.COM

More symbols & emblems: Complete list of official Arizona state symbols from NETSTATE.COM.

Rex Allen, Jr.: Official page, with discography, photos, appearances, news, credits, and biography.

Rex Allen "Arizona Cowboy" Museum & Willcox Cowboy Hall of Fame: Rex Allen - last of the singing cowboys, creating a unique storyline all its own.

State Songs of America
State Songs
of America

Michael J. Bristow

State Songs of America, by Michael J. Bristow. 185 pages. Publisher: Greenwood (February 28, 2000)

State Songs of America provides the music and lyrics for the official songs adopted by the state governments. Arranged alphabetically by state, each song has a single vocal line over a piano accompaniment, with one verse only under the vocal line and remaining verses appearing separately. Each entry includes the date the song was adopted, the name of the composer, and in some instances, a brief history of the song. The book will be a useful reference for those wanting to perform a state song or to find the official songs of other states. Keep in mind that this book was published in 2000 and does not contain later adoptions.

State Songs: Anthems and Their Origins
State Songs:
Anthems and Their Origins

John Hladczuk
Sharon Schneider Hladczuk

State Songs: Anthems and Their Origins, by John Hladczuk, Sharon Schneider Hladczuk. 240 pages. Publisher: Scarecrow Press (September 26, 2000)

State Songs: Anthems and Their Origins is a tremendous resource, from which readers will gain insight into the heritage of American statehood. Histories of these songs, biographical information about the composers and lyricists, and background on each song's entrance into status as "official" make this source the most comprehensive in existence. The entries include sheet music, allowing readers to reproduce for themselves the tunes that have proved so important in the history of the Union. Music teachers, history teachers, librarians, and anyone else interested in learning more about the United States will not want to be without State Songs. Organized alphabetically by state. Keep in mind that this book was published in 2000 and does not contain later adoptions.

Singing Cowboys
Singing Cowboys
Rex Allen
Rex Allen, Jr.

Singing Cowboys, Rex Allen and Rex Allen, Jr. Audio CD (July 11, 1995). Original Release Date: July 11, 1995. Publisher: Warner/Reprise Cntry Adv.

This compilation includes many classic Western tunes and each is sung with such depth and love for the music, they paint a picture in your mind of the countless scenes of the desert and Wild West of movies and TV.

  1. Can You Hear Those Pioneers
  2. Tyin' Knots In The Devil's Tail
  3. Yippi Cry Yi
  4. Ride Cowboy Ride
  5. Tumbling Tumbleweeds/Cool Water
  6. Little Joe the Wrangler
  7. Texas Plains
  8. When The Work's All Done This Fall
  9. Last Of The Silver Screen Cowboys
  10. Arizona
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