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Maryland Economy


Livestock products comprise the bulk of Maryland's farm income. In terms of revenue generated, Maryland's top five agricultural products are broilers (young chickens), greenhouse and nursery products, dairy products, corn for grain, and soybeans.


Broilers (5 to 12-week-old chickens) are Maryland's leading farm product, followed by dairy products (milk).

Other livestock products are beef cattle, eggs, chicken eggs, hogs, and turkeys.


Most of Maryland's crop income is from greenhouse and nursery products (flowers, ornamental shrubs, young fruit trees).

Corn for grain and soybeans are also important sources of revenue in the state.

Other important crops include wheat, hay, barley and tobacco.

The most important vegetables are sweet corn and tomatoes.

Apples are the biggest fruit crop.

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Manufacturers add value to raw products by creating manufactured items. For example, cotton cloth becomes more valuable than a boll of cotton through manufacturing processes.

Computer and electronic products (communications equipment, surveillance and navigation instruments) are Maryland's most important manufactured products.

Food processing (soft drinks, alcoholic beverages, poultry products, spices, bread) ranks second.

Chemical production (soaps, other cleaners, pharmaceuticals, paint) ranks third.


Crushed stone, used in the construction industry, is the most valuable mined product of Maryland.

Other mined products are limestone, marble, sand and gravel, coal, natural gas, clay, peat and Portland cement.


Maryland is a leading state in the production of blue crabs.

Other products are Atlantic croakers, catfish, clams, crabs, menhaden, oysters, scallops, striped bass, flounder, white perch, swordfish and tuna.


Community, business and personal services such as private health care (doctor's offices, private hospitals) and support services for business/government (computer programming, consulting, data processing, janitorial, security) lead in the services sector.

Finance, insurance and real estate ranks second. Baltimore is a leading financial center in the eastern United States.

Government services (operation of public schools, hospitals, military activities) is Maryland's third-ranking service industry.


Edward C. Papenfuse and Robert D. Mitchell, "Maryland," World Book Online Americas Edition, http://www.worldbookonline.com/wbol/wbPage/na/ar/co/347320, August 15, 2001.

U.S. Department of Agriculture: National Agricultural Statistics Service, "Maryland State Agriculture Overview, 2004", 3 January 2006, <http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_by_State/Ag_Overview/AgOverview_MD.pdf> (12 January 2006)

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